Have a question, or a comment about the website? Leave it here:

Add Comment

* Required information
1000
Type the word for the number 9.
Captcha Image
Powered by Commentics

Comments (11)

Sort By
Topic: Page Two
5/5 (5)
Gravatar
New
Chris Phillips
Gravatar
2
1
0
Jan 2017
Chris Phillips (Richmond, Virginia, US) says...

This is a fantastic site! I own a large residential electrical company in Virginia and intend on using some of this information to help train my guys. My only suggestion- There is nothing mentioned about drilling out. Always make sure your bit is sharp, drill the least amount of holes as possible, map your circuits as you drill, and know what you can and cannot drill.

Gravatar
New
Chris Phillips
Gravatar
2
1
0
Jan 2017
Chris Phillips (Richmond, Virginia, US) says...

I stand corrected!! Upon further clicking, I found the "Drilling" page. Great!!

Gravatar
New
Ryan
Gravatar
8
1
0
Dec 2016
Top Poster
First Poster
Ryan says...

Great comments on the drilling Chris. There's definitely some good information I could add on the subject. This site is a work in progress (so far, about a 6 year work in progress, lol), but I try to make time to add and adjust things as I can, when my regular day job permits. It is great to hear positive comments from other skilled tradesmen!

Gravatar
New
aaron
Gravatar
1
1
0
Jan 2017
aaron (Texas, US) says...

I have a 512 sf cabin just built, and we're going to have wood burning for heat, probably a large window ac, propane cook stove, water heater and dryer, new appliances...question is will a 100 amp panel do? And should i use 12-2 or 12-3? thanks

Gravatar
New
Ryan
Gravatar
8
1
0
Dec 2016
Top Poster
First Poster
Ryan says...

Thanks for the question Aaron. If you want an actual accurate load calculation for your service, you can put all of your information into my service size calculator here: http://wireyourownhouse.com/tools/housecalc.html . Just at a glance though, if you are using all gas appliances, and with the cabin being that small, I'd say a 100 amp service would be plenty. Your calculated load will most likely come out to be a fair amount less than that, but the NEC does require a minimum service of 100 amps to a dwelling unit. As for whether to use 12-2 or 12-3, it depends on what you are using it for. 12-2 has two conductors (think hot and neutral) and a ground. That means that 12-2 can carry one 20A circuit, which is fine for a single circuit run of outlets, lights, or whatever. 12-3 has three conductors (think two hots and one neutral), which means it can, in most circumstances, carry two 20A circuits (one on the black, one on the red, and they share a neutral).

Gravatar
New
poynter
Gravatar
1
2
0
Jan 2017
poynter says...

Thank you for this wonderful blog. I seen this first time in this blog. It is really interesting. Keep sharing such new information. Keep sharing such new information.

Gravatar
New
Alan Penick
Gravatar
1
1
0
Jan 2017
Alan Penick (Venice, Florida, US) says...

I am working in an existing home with an already installed 200 amp panel

There is room for additional breakers, but do not want to overload the panel.

How can I calculate how may more breaker amps I can add.

Gravatar
New
Ryan
Gravatar
8
1
0
Dec 2016
Top Poster
First Poster
Ryan says...

Hi Alan. The easiest way to do that would be to do a load calculation on what you currently have. You can use my tool here: http://www.wireyourownhouse.com/tools/housecalc.html. That will tell you where you're currently at, then you can see how much space you have left. Keep in mind that even when adding breakers or circuits, you don't just add the amp number of the breakers, they will seldom, if ever, actually draw that much. Just figure the estimated load on the circuits you are adding.

Gravatar
New
Mark
Gravatar
1
1
0
Dec 2016
Mark (Nebraska, US) says...

I was ready to get a permit to rewire my upstairs and then I read this: "Please be advised that according to state law, permits and inspections for wiring of single family dwellings are only legally required if a new electrical service is installed."

What constitutes "new electrical service"?

Gravatar
New
Ryan
Gravatar
8
1
0
Dec 2016
Top Poster
First Poster
Ryan says...

Hi Mark! That's a good question. I haven't seen that wording before, what state are you in? The electrical service consists of the meter, the main panel and the service entrance conductors. It sounds like you are probably just rewiring or installing branch circuits to lights and plugs; if that's the case then, according to that wording, it sounds like you may not need a permit in your area.

Page 2 of 3