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Jim Schmidt
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Jim Schmidt (Roseburg, Oregon, US) says...

Alright Ryan.

Hopefully last question for awhile.

I have a dedicated circuit for my fire/co2 detector. Does this also need an AFCI breaker?

Thanks for all of your assistance to date. Invaluable.

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Ryan
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Ryan says...

I would have to find out a little more information, and you might need to ask your local inspector. I think the way I would probably look at that would be that if you are using regular detectors, located throughout the house, and just using a dedicated circuit to feed them all, I would say yes. If you have a central security/alarm system with a single control box that takes line voltage and uses low voltage sensing devices, I would say the outlet or power circuit for the main fire alarm panel would fall under exception and not require AFCI.

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Jim Schmidt
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Jim Schmidt (Roseburg, Oregon, US) says...

Are AFCI breakers required for living area circuuts in Oregon. Tbey are pretty expensive compare to standarx breakers so i would rather not install ghem if not needed.

Thanks

Jim

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Ryan
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Ryan says...

Yes, they are expensive but yes, unfortunately they are required in Oregon in most areas, with a few exceptions. In general, they are required for everywhere except hallways and outlets that are GFCI protected or that are for dedicated appliances that are not easily moved. You are allowed a dedicated circuit for things like an entertainment system without AFCI. You can find the exact wording here: http://www.oregon.gov/bcd/laws-rules/Documents/oars/305_Table_1-E.pdf. Look under OESC 210.12.

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Jim Schmidt
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Jim Schmidt (Roseburg, Oregon, US) says...

I am wiring my lighting with the power running to the lights rather than to the switches. What/is there a correct method to run 3 lights(bar) off of one switch this way?

Thanks

Jim is

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Ryan
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Ryan says...

Hi Jim,

You need to run a three conductor cable (12/3 or 14/3, depending on circuit size) from the first light box, the one with your power, to the switch box.

In the switch box you will just cap off the white with a wire nut, you don't need a neutral right now, but the code requires it to be there. Land the bare ground on the green screw on the switch, the black on one of the brass screws and the red on the other one.

Then from the light box run a regular two conductor cable to your other light boxes. Back in the first light box, connect all the grounds together along with the light ground. Connect all the white neutrals together along with the light neutral. Connect the power wire coming into the box to the black wire going down to your switch. Lastly, connect the red wire from the cable going to your switch to the black light wire and the black wire in the cable running to your other lights.

You have made what's called a "switch loop".

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Jim Schmidt
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Jim Schmidt (Roseburg, Oregon, US) says...

Thanks again, Ryan.

perfect.

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Mike Torres
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Mike Torres (San Antonio, Texas, US) says...

I'm building a new shop in my back yard, 30x20 two story. Downstairs will be my wood shop nothing fancy, upstairs will be my man cave entertainment system i.e. Tv cable small frig"

Not sure if I'm going to have a window unit or install a Mitsubishi wall hangar..

I'm going to run 0/3 wire from the house panel to the shop. What size electric panel should I use.. And is the 0/3 over kill?

Any help is appreciated.

Mike

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Ryan
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Ryan says...

Hi Mike,

With limited details on your building, I'll give you a general idea of what you may need. Of course, you can always use my service size calculator at http://wireyourownhouse.com/tools/housecalc.html.

In a residential wood shop I guess we would assume no really large tools and you're only using one at a time. With this assumption and your upstairs needing minimal power you could probably squeak by with a 30 amp feed, but I would recommend no smaller than a 60 amp for a place like yours.

If you put a 60 amp breaker in your house panel, that becomes your overcurrent protection and the panel in your shop is just a main disconnect and protection for your circuits. With that in mind, you would need at least a 60 amp panel (or larger) with enough circuit spaces for what you want to have.

If you are speaking copper, 3/0 is good for 200 amps, so way overkill. For 60 amps you would only need #6 copper or #4 aluminum.

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Jim Schmidt
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Jim Schmidt (Roseburg, Oregon, US) says...

connecting exterior surface mounted meter base/disconnect to load center via SER cable through back of meter base. How do I connect cable to meter base through wall? Just cut larger hole in wall board to accommodate standard cable clamp or is there a better alternative?

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Ryan
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Ryan says...

Hi Jim,

If the wall is open,the best way is to just cut a larger hole in the sheathing and use a regular cable clamp for the cable. If you are going all the way through a wall that is finished on the inside with sheetrock already, you could use PVC to sleeve the cable through the wall, with the appropriate fittings. Either way, remember to caulk around your meter base on the outside to prevent leaking into your wall.

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Jim Schmidt
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Jim Schmidt (Roseburg, Oregon, US) says...

Thanks Ryan. Will do.

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